To the editor:

After reading Dr. Wolf’s article, “Social Justice: Religion and Politics,” I wanted to offer a word of thanks to him for having brought the issue up. Living as Christians — not conservatives or liberals, Republicans or Democrats — means to speak about the faith we have in Jesus certainly as well as live it. In the early decades of the faith, the followers of Jesus were known as belonging to the Way (see Acts 9:2; 19:9, 23; 22:4; 24:14, 22). Scholars have deduced that this was an early name for Christianity precisely because of how the early Christians lived — according to the Way of Jesus — which was rather peculiar at that time.

The Gospel was an anti-imperial message that directly rebutted the nationalist propaganda of Rome. To declare Jesus as King and the church as the Kingdom of God often invited the attention and persecution early Christians endured. However, I might argue that devotion to Jesus for any Christian should be paramount more so than party allegiance. What’s sad is how Christians have become so un-Christian in the name of their candidate, political philosophy, and party. Perhaps if Christians preferred to be Christians instead of identifying themselves as Democrat or Republican, we might meet on the equal ground of the Gospel, work together for good, and respect our differences in the process.

After all, it was Christianity, not the state, that took upon itself what Dr. Wolf cited from McCaulley: “respect for the human dignity of each person.” In the early centuries of Christianity, the church accepted responsibility for burying the dead (Christian or not), caring for the sick, creating hospitals and hospices, and offering food to the poor. When Julian the Apostate attempted to revive the dead Roman cults, he was unable to do so because of Christians’ philanthropy when the heathen religion did not attempt such charity.

Again, it was the church, not the state, that accomplished this, and it did so well. Rather than relying on the state for such things, perhaps we the church should get back to being Jesus’ followers and doing His work, which includes not “social justice” per se, but doing what’s right by our Lord.

Steven Hunter

Murray

To the editor:

“Privilege is not knowing that you’re hurting others and not listening when they tell you.”

– DaShanne Stokes

The presence of Robert E. Lee standing atop a “whites-only” water fountain is unwelcoming and hurtful to many prospective and current Calloway County community members. In contrast to what has been said, the #movethemonument group does not want to destroy or erase this white-washed, blood-stained history. Moving it to a more appropriate setting like the Bowman Cemetary or Fort Heiman is a reasonable compromise. The Fiscal Court’s continued dismissal of our calls to #movethemonument is a prime example of privilege. Our elected officials should put their pride and privilege aside to do what is morally right and Move the Monument.

Shannon Davis-Roberts

Murray